Kosovo Information

This Kosovo Information page provides facts, sights and practical tips about the republic of Kosovo.

Religion in Kosovo

The Republic of Kosovo is a secular state. The majority of the inhabitants have a Muslim heritage, and practice a very mild form of Islam. Everywhere throughout the country you will find mosques, and the big feasts of Islam being celebrated yearly. In most of the cities in Kosovo you hardly see women with headscarves. Most of the Kosovars consider their Albanian ethnicity to be of higher importance than their religious identity. Around 60,000 Kosovars consider themselves Catholic. Read all about this topic at our special Kosovo information page about religion.

Cities in Kosovo

The most important cities in Kosovo are Pristina, Peja, Prizren and Gjakova. Mitrovica is known for its large Serbian minority. Other big cities are Gjilan and Ferizaj. Read about the cities at our special Kosovo information page about cities.

Kosovo independence

Kosovo was after the war in 1999 officially still a part of Serbia, but ruled by the United Nations. Kosovo self-declared their independence on February 17th, 2008.kosovo-information-independence

The new status was quickly backed by a majority of the Western countries. Read all about this topic at our Kosovo information page about independence.

International organizations in Kosovo

NATO in Kosovo

Since the Kosovo war of 1999, several NATO-forces have been in the country. Their mission was given the name KFOR. KFOR started with 50,000 members in 1999, and the military force in the country decreased year by year until they reached 4,559 in 2016. In several cities, the KFOR-troops no longer have a large presence.

The majority of cities in Kosovo are now very safe.

EU in Kosovo

The European Union is present in Kosovo with the name EULEX. The main purpose of the mission is to help establish the rule of law. EULEX became fully kosovo-information-united-statesoperational in 2009 and had the support of both the EU member states and Canada, Norway, Switzerland, Turkey and the US.

United States of America in Kosovo

The USA is very present in the Republic of Kosovo with military, political and NGO-related means. Most of the Kosovars are thankful to America for their role in the liberation of Kosovo in 1999. In capital Pristina, there is a large statue of former President Bill Clinton.

The military presence of the United States is very large in Kosovo. One of the largest US military bases, outside their own land, is situated in Kosovo. A few thousand can stay at the base, called Camp Bondsteel.

The Americans have a large embassy and are building a new one, worth around 200 million euro. There was once an important meeting where the Kosovo’s president convinced two political party leaders to form a new government, and the US ambassador was the only other person in the room.

United Nations in Kosovo

AKosovo-footballfter the war in Kosovo, the United Nations in Kosovo were practically ruling the country. Kosovo was a so-called U.N. protectorate. The UN started with 9,000 workers, and decreased that number to a couple hundred in 2016.

Kosovo Football team

The football team of Kosovo is recognized by both the FIFA and the UEFA since 2016. Before that, Kosovo was only allowed to play international friendlies, since 2014. In the first year of their friendly matches, Kosovo played against Haiti, Turkey, Senegal and Oman. Read all this topic at our Kosovo information page about football.

Kosovo news websites

Looking for news about Kosovo in English? The country has several media outlets that write articles in the English language. News about Kosovo can be found via Kosovapress, Kosovolive360, Gazeta Express, RKTlive and Balkan Insight.

Travel information Kosovo

kosovo-information-travelSecurity in Kosovo

Kosovo is in general a very safe place to stay. Military violence or riots are mostly only found in the Mitrovica area in the north. This is the area with a large number of Serbian inhabitants. From time to time, an incident takes places in this region. Incidents in Mitrovica are often published in international newspapers, which might give the impression that ‘whole the country’ is dangerous.

The majority of Kosovars are pro-Western and pro-European and want to take care of tourists and other visitors. Walking on the streets at night is in general a safe thing to do. Like always: use common sense.

Language in Kosovo

The language of Kosovars is Albanian, because of the large majority of ethnic Albanians in the country (more than 90%). Albanian is an independent language, influenced by Latin and Greek, but also by Ottoman Turkish.

Serbian is also an official language in Kosovo and can be seen on many governmental signs and websites. Other recognized regional languages are Bosnian, Turkish, Gorani and Romani.

kosovo-information-languageNames of cities at road signs are written in both Albanian and Serbian. In the city of Prizren, you will even find the street signs in Turkish too. Many Kosovars do speak English or German as a second language. In the center of the capital Pristina is a large number of Western expats. Ordering a coffee or beer in the English language is common. Many young Kosovars have studied abroad, and therefore speak good English. Therefore, they can also give you some personal ‘Kosovo information’.

Passports and travel documents in Kosovo

EU civilians and Americans can enter Kosovo without a visa and are allowed to stay three months. Of course, you need a passport to enter the Republic of Kosovo. Several citizens, like the Dutch, are also allowed to enter with an ID card. If you are from of one of these countries, you do not need a visa.

Inhabitants of 87 countries do need a visa to enter Kosovo. It’s not a matter of just buying a visa at the border, so be prepared. This website of a university might give you additional information. Curious about all Kosovan embassies in the world?

Time difference with Kosovo

Kosovo is in the Central European Time zone, which means Rugova-valley-snowthat they have the same time as Amsterdam, Paris, Berlin and Brussels. Kosovo has daylight savings time and wintertime.

Weather in Kosovo

Kosovo has long, warm summers, and cold winters. You might experience nice temperatures between April and October. June, July, and August have high temperatures, regularly above 30 degrees Celsius. There is a short spring and a short fall.

Winters are often intense, with a lot of frost, and from time to time much snow, which is ideal for winter holidays. Snow in the mountains is often visible until the end of April.

The big mountains cause weather differences between several cities. So when checking the internet for the weather news, make sure you type in the correct city. Note: sometimes weather website uses the Serbian names for cities. Interested which places are great to visit in summer or winter time? Visit our Kosovo information page about tourism.

Vaccinations and injections for Kosovo

Seek advice from your own doctor about vaccines for Kosovo. Do not wait till the day before you leave. Hepatitis A and DPT vaccines might be advised for example.

Kosovo is full of pharmacies (called ‘Barnatore’ in Albanian language) and kosovo-information-macchiatoare often opened till late. Supermarkets and shops in Kosovo sell many kinds of cleaning supplies these days.

In general, it’s safe to buy food on the street or go to qebabtores or restaurants. You find more about this subject on number #7 of the Kosovo information page that shares ten positive points about Kosovo.

Drink water quality in Kosovo

The quality of tap water is different per region, but we advise you to buy bottled water in a shop. Kosovars do drink the tap water. Prices for a bottle of water are very low, and on the street they sell everywhere small bottles for around 20 euro cent.

In restaurants, if you order a coffee, it is normal to receive a glass of water together with it. This is often tap water, so don’t feel bad to leave it untouched. By the way, the story goes that caffè macchiato in Kosovo is the best in the world.

Local currency in Kosovo

Since 2002, you pay with the euro in Kosovo, although the Republic is not an official euro country. In the couple of Serbian parts of the country, the Serbian dinar is preferred.

In shops, supermarkets, restaurants and hotels they prefer you to pay cash. kosovo-information-hotelCredit cards are often allowed, but having the transaction go through is not a guarantee.

Kosovo is full of ATMs, but not all will accept your foreign bank card. So when possible, take several bank cards with you.

Smoking ban in Kosovo

Smoking is not permitted in cafes and restaurants in Kosovo. Just like in other countries, it doesn’t guarantee that a place is certainly smoke free. Big and modern restaurants will have a greater chance of being smoke free than small cafes in villages.

Kosovo information about Tourism

Kosovo is a perfect destination for those who want to enjoy nature’s beauty and beautiful cultural sights: big waterfalls, national parks, ancient monasteries, traditional cities and beautiful mosques. Check out the Kosovo highlights at our Kosovo information page about Tourism.

Flying to Kosovo

Kosovo has a brand new international airport, twenty minutes by car from the center of the capital Pristina. The name of the airport of Kosovo is Adem Jashari International Airport. kosovo-information-airportMany planes fly directly to Kosovo. Read about the airport and flights to Kosovo at our special Kosovo information page about Pristina Flights.

Public holidays in Kosovo

Kosovo celebrates ten public holidays. Governmental workers, offices and others that can afford it are having a day off. You will find all the public holidays and their dates listed at the page Kosovo public holidays.

This is the end of the Kosovo Information page. Do you miss something? Feel free to write your comment below. Thank you!

13 thoughts on “Kosovo Information

  1. Weldon

    You can earn some additional money from your page, i see couple opportunities here.
    You should search in google for:
    Yoogurn’s money making

    Reply
  2. Marko

    “This is the area with a large number of Serbian inhabitants, which sometimes leads to violence.”
    This sounds racist and unfair. The Serbs in the north do not want to be part of independent Kosovo in the same way the Albanians in Kosovo did not want to be a part of Serbia after 1989. This is political problem, not a sign that that one ethic group is inherently violent.
    In the info about religion, there is no word about Orthodox Christianity, the second most important religion in Kosovo (more practitioners than Catholics). I guess that is because its practitioners are Serbs. I think it is sad, because it makes your nice presentation somewhat misleading. All World Heritage Sites on Kosovo are Orthodox Christian churches. For that reason it is impossible to ignore the silence. If Kosovo wants to be modern and inclusive, these glaring omissions are unacceptable.

    Reply
    1. Kosovo Info Post author

      Dear Marko, thank you very much for your critical feedback. Although we did not mean to be ‘racist and unfair’, we are aware of the fact that this sentence might be taken like this. Therefore, we have changed it immediately.

      Concerning your comment about our Religion page: we don’t understand this, cause there are several words spoken about Serbian Orthodox, including a link to a page about the monastery in Decan. So please read again.

      Reply
  3. BEYIOKU OLANIYI O

    me and my family will want to come for Kosovo Torist visit I NEED A GOOD TORIST COMPANY CONTACTS

    Reply
    1. Blenda

      I would suggest http://www.beinkosovo.com
      They’re very professional and experienced at what they do. They provide services such as transportation , accommodation , tour guides , interpreters etc. I hope I could help you!

      Reply
      1. Kosovo Info Post author

        Thank you Blenda. Its true, many activities and services are offered by them.

        Reply
  4. Pingback: Where is Kosovo? – Megan's Mischief Managed

  5. Anjeline

    Thank you for this page! I will be moving to Kosovo from the USA to teach and I’m extremely excited to learn more and be a part of this beautiful country!

    Reply
  6. Pingback:  Eight Reasons To Do Business In Kosovo - Balkans

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *